Naturalization – HOW U.S. CITIZENSHIP WORKS

To become a US Citizen is a dream dreamt by many but realized by few, relatively speaking. I can’t tell you the vast number of people who want to become a citizen of the United States but never do because of fear and a lack of knowledge about what options are available to them. Our Los Angeles immigration attorneys want to ensure that no one goes without the opportunity to have their dreams come true. For this reason our full-service immigration law firm currently offers free consultations with no obligation to new and potentially interest clients, and we highly encourage you to contact our office and explore what options are available to you.

All right, so you want to become a US Citizen. Unfortunately, force of will isn’t enough, but the greater your resolve the better chance you have, and whatever you’re lacking our firm will gladly provide (what can I say? That’s the kind of confidence that comes from approval after approval and overjoyed client after overjoyed client). Los Angeles immigration attorneys from our firm are incredibly skilled and are arguably the best and most qualified immigration lawyers practicing today.

There are some general qualifications that most people must meet in order to qualify for naturalization, which, by the way, is the application process to become a citizen. In all but the rarest of cases, one needs to be a green-card holder (permanent resident) before he or she can apply for citizenship. On top of this, you must be a permanent resident for at least five years in most cases, though there are a few exceptions we will address later. Speak with a Los Angeles immigration attorney or Glendale immigration attorney from our firm to explore your options.

Additionally, you must generally

Be 18 years of age or older
Have good moral character
Know the basic history of the US and the structure of its government
Continually reside and be physically present in the US for a period of time
Be able to read, write, and speak basic English
            Exceptions to this rule are extended to individuals of advanced age with long periods of permanent residency as well as disabled persons. For specific rules and regulations, contact our firm and speak with an immigration attorney.

The other instances I talked about earlier in which someone may be able to qualify for naturalization include when an individual is at least 18 and has been a permanent resident:

            For at least five years
            For at least three years and has been married to a US citizen for the entirety of that time
            For at least three years and obtained their green-card under VAWA
            While honorably serving in the US for at least one year, and the application for citizenship is filed with serving or within 6 months of an honorable discharge.

All right, I think I’ve yammered at you for long enough, don’t you? Speak with our team of immigration attorneys and let’s begin forging a brighter tomorrow.

Contact Us