How to Bring Your Parents to the U.S.

grandmotherFamilies are the backbone of the United States, and in a land of immigrants, we understand the desire to unite parents and children who have been separated. If you are a U.S. citizen with non-citizen parents, and you wish to bring your parents to the U.S. as permanent residents, you will have to file a petition on your parents’ behalf. An immigration lawyer will advise you through this process, at the end of which your parents will receive green cards and will become permanent residents of the United States.

The Parental Paperwork You’ll Need for the Petition

USCIS has provided a list of documents that you will need to provide along with the petition. The list adjusts slightly for each situation, but in every case, you will need to provide a) a copy of your birth certificate, and b) proof of your citizenship. If you have any questions on how to obtain these things, your immigration lawyer will be able to provide answers.

Other documents that you will need to provide are:

  1. If you are petitioning on behalf of your mother who lives outside of the United States, you will need to make sure that your birth certificate has your mother’s name on it. If you or your mother have legally changed names, you will need to include documentation demonstrating this name change.
  2. If you are petitioning on behalf of your father who lives outside of the United States, you will also need to provide a copy of your parents’ marriage certificate.
  3. If you were born out of wedlock and were not legitimated by your father before your 18th birthday, and you are petitioning on behalf of your feather, you will need to provide some sort of evidence that emotional or financial ties existed between you and your father either before you turned 21 or before you married.
  4. If you were born out of wedlock and were legitimated by your father before your 18th birthday, you will need to provide evidence that you were legitimated, whether through marriage or according to the laws in you or your father’s country. Your immigration lawyer can answer any questions you have about evidence of this type.
  5. If you are petitioning on behalf of a step-parent, you will need to also include proof of the marriage between one of your birth parents and your step-parent that demonstrates that the marriage took place before your 18th birthday. You will also need to provide evidence that any previous marriages either your natural or step parent had entered were ended legally. Should this apply to you, you can discuss types of evidence with your immigration attorney, as well.
  6. If you are petitioning on behalf of an adoptive parent, you must provide a certified copy of your adoption certificate showing that the adoption took place before your 16th birthday. Your immigration lawyer can help you obtain this. Also, you must offer a statement showing the dates and places you lived with your adoptive parent.

The Right Immigration Lawyer Can Expedite Your Process

Any questions you have about your circumstances and pertinent documentation should be directed to your immigration lawyer. Once your petition has been approved, your parent(s) can apply for their green card(s) at the U.S. consulate nearest to them. Once they’ve arrived, they will not need to apply for a work permit. When they pass through customs, they will receive a stamp on their passport indicating that they are currently waiting for their green card; this stamp will provide that they are eligible to work in the US.

Your immigration attorney wants to help you bring your parents to the U.S. Contact him/her to discuss what you need to do to begin your petition process. We look forward to helping you welcome your parents as they cross through customs and enter as new permanent resident of the United States.

Contact Us